Despite being abundantly available in Vitamin A rich foods,

Despite being abundantly available in Vitamin A rich foods,

Vitamin A Uses and Benefits
Despite being abundantly available in Vitamin A rich foods, one-third of the world’s children under the age of five, suffer from its deficiency, according to a 2009 World Health Organisation’s global database on Vitamin A Deficiency. This deficiency has also been known to be fatal to kids, and has also been held responsible for causing preventable childhood blindness, particularly in South East Asian and Africa (as per a 2013 report by the National Institutes of Health). Numerous scientific studies have pointed at the health benefits of consuming adequate vitamin A, as part of your daily diet.

Also Read: Vitamins for Skin: A Guide to a Healthier, Radiant You

Let’s look at some of the important roles and benefits of consuming Vitamin A:


1. Eye Health
Vitamin A is responsible for maintaining eye health, as it converts the light entering our eyes into electrical signals that can be then interpreted by the brain. Additionally, Vitamin A is a component of the pigment rhodopsin, which is found in the retina of the eye and is said to be photosensitive.

Also Read: Ayurveda For Eyes: Home Remedies And Diet Tips To Follow During Summers

2. Improved Immunity
A deficiency of Vitamin A can leave you to be vulnerable to a number of diseases and consuming it ensures that your body’s defences are active. This vitamin is important for maintenance of the mucous lining in the eyes, gut, genitalia and the lungs, and it is also crucial for development of white blood cells that fight infectious diseases.

3. Fights Acne
Acne is a skin problem that involves severe breakout of pimples that are often painful and most often even leave scars behind. Vitamin A is said to prevent development of acne.

Also Read: Home Remedies for Acne: Your Ultimate Guide to Get Rid of Acne

hme31v5Vitamin A foods fight acne and pimples
4. Healthy Bones
Vitamin A also supports bone development and health and a deficiency of this vitamin has been linked with poor bone health. Some studies have shown that people with low levels of Vitamin A in blood are susceptible to bone fractures.

5. Reproductive Health
Vitamin A is important for maintaining the reproductive health of both men and women, especially the latter by ensuring the proper growth and development of the embryos during pregnancy. Deficiency of vitamin A in an expectant mother’s diet has been linked with birth defects in their kids.

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